Tag Archives: North Brisbane Tuition

Ethan’s Great Escape – by Cohen (aged 9)

boyOnce upon a time, a little boy named Ethan lived in a very nice neighbourhood, in a very nice house but the people who were raising him were very, very horrible and selfish. Even though they were fat and rich, his punishment was so cruel that they locked him up in the cellar for most of the day and while his mother and father were upstairs eating fudge and custard, Ethan was living on the mould and bacteria off the walls. One night, he heard squeaking and it sounded like a million mice and he was certain because he could smell rat droppings as well. Little tiny mice were chewing the wall and Ethan was happy to see daylight because the wall had disintegrated. Ethan got out and found a new home to live in with nice people.

Cohen, aged 9. 

Leave a comment

Filed under children's Stories, creative writing, Short Story, Student's Story

“The Fight” by Abbie (aged 12)

GladiatorOn a rainy, cold winter morning in Dublin, Alex and Fiona watched in amazement as everyone around them slowly disappeared into the foggy air.  They heard a loud cheer and clinks and clanks that could be sword fighting and they realised they had somehow been transported into the middle of a gladiator fight.  A big, strong man charged over and forced two golden swords into their hands and told them to fight for their life.  Alex stabbed with his sword at a highly-scarred, fierce gladiator who collapsed with a gasp, and Fiona fought a ferocious lion who bit off her leg.  Suddenly the cheering crowd disappeared into the foggy air and they rushed to the Dublin hospital to save Fiona’s life.

Abbie (aged 12)

Leave a comment

Filed under Short Story, Student's Story, Uncategorized

Students’ Stories – The Puppet (Nikita – aged 10)

Sock PuppetIt was just after lunch and Bang!  The puppet knocked over the bookshelf which fell on top of the new television.  She had straight yellow wool for hair with black sewn-on buttons for eyes and inside her long pink dress was my hand.  Mum stomped into the room as the puppet grinned but it was me that Mum shouted at.  When Mum turned her back, the puppet jumped on the counter, ripped the paintings off the wall and tipped over the bowl of fruit.  After lunch, I took the puppet off my hand , picked up the mess and mopped the floors.

Nikita (aged 10)

Leave a comment

Filed under Childrens Story, creative writing, Student's Story

“G” is for a Good Read

“Today a reader, tomorrow a leader.” – Margaret Fuller

Baby ReadingHow important is it to be a reader in this world of instant information?  Does sitting with your child and playing computer games produce the same outcome as sitting with them and reading a book?  Does it matter that you have never sat with your child and read to them before they have attended school?

More research is coming forward to indicate it does matter that a child is not read to or encouraged to pick up a book, even to scribble in.

Sitting with book in hand and child on lap allows them to see symbols, words and images.  Moving your finger, leading their eyes along symbols of words and from words to images, allows little ones to make connections, at their own pace, with these symbols, words and images.  Their vocabulary grows.

They may not yet be attending kindergarten or pre-school, but you are already preparing their mind for life-long learning.  You have been helping their brain develop neuro-pathways that will assist with learning when they attend pre-school and beyond.  Now, not every child will be ready to make these connections, just as not every child is ready to attend school at the tender age of five.  These things happen when the child is ready, and you can’t rush it.

Spending this quality time with your toddler is crucial to early childhood development.  Andre Biemiller, a Canadian psychologist, studied the consequences of lower vocabulary levels in young children.  The results of his studies indicated that children entering kindergarten in the bottom 25% of vocabulary generally remained behind the other children.  By year six they were approximately three years behind their peers in vocabulary, reading and comprehension.

But what of teenagers?  Is this a time for them to stop reading and focus on computer coding and super hero movies?  Jonathon Douglas, of the National Literacy Trust (U.K.) doesn’t think so in his 2013 article “The Importance of Instilling a Need to Read”

“Teens who choose to pick up a book for pleasure are more likely to succeed in life.”

His article intimates that reading for pleasure reveals a predisposition for life-long learning which he suggests explains increased social mobility.  If life-long reading is one indicator for success then how may you encourage your moody teenage, or pre-teen, to put down the games console in exchange for the printed word?

We are unlikely to read material that does not interest us, so to encourage a reading for pleasure environment in your household you should supply reading material (graphic novels, magazines, fiction and non-fiction novels) that will be of interest to your teenager.  Hopefully, the school library will also have a supply of reading material that falls outside the curriculum.

What about reading on the internet?  Research has shown that we adopt different styles of reading for different formats.  Internet reading tends to lead to short concentration skimming rather than in-depth absorption.

Over the past few decades, authors have been producing extraordinary books written with the adolescent in mind.  These books deal with issues teenagers may be exposed to or experiencing in their life and allows them to deal with them from the safety of the book.

This is not to say teenagers should not be exposed to the classics of Dickens and the like, but there are books more relevant to them and their time.  The classics may come later in life with the pleasure of reading.

Exploring the world through books, gathering information and understanding develops a solid core of knowledge upon which to build ethics, morality and character that becomes the young adult.

Leave a comment

Filed under Learning, Tuition Tips

“The Chameleon” by Dardo (aged 9)

chameleonJust before dawn two young explorers were in the jungle walking past a large shrub when they spotted an injured chameleon.  They were animal carers so they took the chameleon back to the lab to fix him up and they found out he had a broken back leg.  Without bandages, they had to go exploring to find a leaf with a numbing agent called the Squashbugla.  Just before the next morning they found the leaves and fixed the chameleon.

Dardo (aged 9)

Leave a comment

Filed under Childrens Story, creative writing, Short Story

Student’s Story – My Dad is a Warlock – by Jemima (aged 9)

MagicianI didn’t know that my dad was a man who was a witch.  I was scared when I found out my dad was a warlock but I still loved him because he is my compassionate gentle dad.  My dad does good magic like making poor people get money and gives people wishes and they come true but sometimes he can be fierce and ferocious at the same time and he does bad magic when that happens.  After I come home from school my dad does some good magic before I go to bed.  I love my warlock dad and he loves me.

Jemima (aged 9)

Leave a comment

Filed under Childrens Story, creative writing, Jemima, Short Story